Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Reasons to write an autobiography

YOU are unique. Every life is a collection of the many people, places and adventures experienced.

Only you can preserve priceless memories. No one else can share your autobiography but YOU. You grew up on a street somewhere. You had a favorite tree or hiding place perhaps. You can remember your parents, your grandparents, a special aunt or uncle. How did you celebrate holidays when you were a child or teenager? What was school like when you were young? Recall some of those priceless memories for yourself and for the people you love. You’ve got some good stories to tell and some of the simplest memories mean a lot.

Only you can share a lifetime of practical wisdom. Life is a good teacher, isn’t it? Every day of life has joys and challenges. We learn and grow along the way. Life isn’t always easy, but we all keep learning things as we go down that road. Other people have much to learn from your life story—good advice, beliefs, values. We’re all getting older (and hopefully wiser) every day. You can help your loved ones, family, and friends prepare for the future with your perspective on life so far.

Only you can provide your own personal glimpse into history. There is nothing better than learning history from an actual personal account instead of a history book. Do you remember a big event in the news, a new invention that revolutionized the world, a new household item that made life easier, a famous person who changed the course of history? It is fascinating to hear what YOU think is interesting from history. It’s amazing to have a chance to walk in your shoes and see the world from your unique perspective.

Only you can create a lasting record for generations to come. If things aren’t recorded, unfortunately they will be lost or forgotten. Some of you may wish you had a book with the life story of your grandparents or great-great grandparents to read. Maybe you’ve got some family genealogy records but who were these people? What made them tick? What was their essence? What was their story? Writing down some portions of your life story in a journal or recording your story via the web or via video will prevent those stories from being lost or forgotten. This process may also open the door for you to share your story with a younger person in your family (maybe one of your children, grandchildren, a niece or nephew perhaps).
As life stories form a bridge between people of all ages. Watch as you and your loved ones experience more genuine connection and new conversations as life stories are shared. You may think that some of the things you have to share aren’t all that important or relevant. However, you may be surprised at how much other people will really appreciate this new information. Capture life’s experiences without delay and watch the stories and the love flow.

So what should you ask yourself? LifeBio has GREAT questions in our online autobiography template to help you get started.

Generation Alzheimer's sheds light on a crisis, motivates us to act

  • This year, the first wave of baby boomers are turning 65 – and with increased age comes increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.


  • Our new report, "Generation Alzheimer's: The Defining Disease of the Baby Boomers," sheds light on a crisis that is no longer emerging – but here.

  • Many baby boomers will spend their retirement years either with Alzheimer's or caring for someone who has it.

  • An estimated 10 million baby boomers will develop Alzheimer's.

  • Starting this year, more than 10,000 baby boomers a day will turn 65. As these baby boomers age, one of out of eight of them will develop Alzheimer’s – a devastating, costly, heartbreaking disease. Increasingly for these baby boomers, it will no longer be their grandparents and parents who have Alzheimer’s – it will be them.

  • "Alzheimer’s is a tragic epidemic that has no survivors. Not a single one," said Harry Johns, president and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association. "It is as much a thief as a killer. Alzheimer’s will darken the long-awaited retirement years of the one out of eight baby boomers who will develop it. Those who will care for these loved ones will witness, day by day, the progressive and relentless realities of this fatal disease. But we can still change that if we act now."

  • According to the new Alzheimer’s Association report, it is expected that 10 million baby boomers will either die with or from Alzheimer’s, the only cause of death among the top 10 in America without a way to prevent, cure or even slow its progression. But, while Alzheimer’s kills, it does so only after taking everything away, slowly stripping an individual’s autonomy and independence. Even beyond the cruel impact Alzheimer’s has on the individuals with the disease, Generation Alzheimer’s also details the negative cascading effects the disease places on millions of caregivers. Caregivers and families go through the agony of losing a loved one twice: first to the ravaging effects of the disease and then, ultimately, to actual death.


  • http://alz-news.org/

    Friday, April 15, 2011

    StandUp Gardens are cool. Flower power.

    On occasion, I see a product that is over-the-top wonderful. That would be the StandUp Gardens that are made for a variety of community settings or at home. With spring upon us, this is a good time to start thinking about planting. 

    http://www.standupgardens.com/babylon1.htm

    There are so many opportunities for older adults and youth to work together to plant a garden with StandUp Gardens.  I met Peter Amarosa at a recent trade show and I think he's created something good here. I just like to pass along ideas that are too good to not know about.

    http://www.standupgardens.com/

    Monday, April 11, 2011

    I'm tired of the word "facility" used to describe a community.

    I hope that the institutional language will finally disappear. I hope I never live in any place called a "facility".  I know people hate the term nursing home too, but "facility" makes me think of prison. Maybe this is why.  Listen as Gary Mohr, Ohio Department of Corrections Director, describes prisons as "facilities" many times during this interview....

    http://www.ohiochannel.org/MediaLibrary/Media.aspx?fileId=129850&returnTo=Collection

    Thursday, April 07, 2011

    Great gift ideas for Mother's Day 2011

    If your mother or grandmother or sister or favorite aunt is hard to shop for, consider the gift of memories. Consider a Memory Gift Box or Life Story Journal or a Memory Journal from LifeBio. There are many options available from LifeBio for writing your life story or helping someone else create a biography. One more thought...if you have a loved one caring for someone with dementia, a great gift to use with an Alzheimer's patient or person with dementia would be the MemoryBio Photo Album and Journal. This works well to generate great discussions using pictures.

    See all products available from LifeBio....
    https://secure.lifebio.com/Default.aspx

    She Calls Me Raymond -- very touching song that shouldn't be missed

    LOVING THIS SONG...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txCUwSKo1kg

    I work down at Ashberry Hills

    Minimum wage, but it pays the bills
    Cleaning floors and leading hymns on Sunday
    Katherine Davis, room 303
    Sweetest soul you ever could meet
    I bring her morning coffee everyday

    Chorus:
    She calls me Raymond
    She thinks I'm her son
    Tells me get washed up for supper
    before your daddy gets home
    She goes on about the weather
    how she can't believe it's already 1943
    She calls me Raymond, and that's all right by me

    She talks about clothes on the line in the summer air
    Christmas morning and Thanksgiving prayer
    Stories of a family that I never had
    Sometimes I find myself wishing I'd been there

    Chorus:
    When she calls me Raymond
    She thinks I'm her son
    Tells me get washed up for supper
    before your daddy gets home
    She goes on about the weather
    how she can't believe it's already 1943
    She calls me Raymond, and that's all right by me

    There's a small white cross in Arlington
    Reads Raymond Davis '71
    Until she can see his face again
    I'm gonna fill in the best I can

    Chorus:
    When she calls me Raymond
    She thinks I'm her son
    Tells me get washed up for supper
    before your daddy gets home
    She goes on about the weather
    how she can't believe it's already 1943
    She calls me Raymond, and that's all right by me
    She calls me Raymond, and that's all right by me

    Monday, April 04, 2011

    Ice cream memories. Everybody has one.

    What's your favorite memory of ice cream? Mine is going to Creamland on Route 20 between Erie, PA and Fairview, PA for ice cream, especially after a long hot day baling hay at the farm. We would be riding home in the back of the Ford pickup truck, and there was no better treat than a big soft serve chocolate ice cream cone. Really, I worked all day for that sweet reward. It was worth it.

    Creamland opened on April 1st for the season and my parents said they stopped for a delicious treat that day.